Upcoming Online Order Retreat – November 07-12

In my last post I talked about the online Order retreat that I’d just done at Adhisthana.  I appreciated the retreat so much that I promptly signed up to do another one. So I’ll be back online from Adhisthana , from the 7th – 12th of November, doing a retreat that I think will follow on well from the one last month.

The essence of bodhicitta is learning to escape the prison of narrow self-concern, and find the freedom that comes with wisdom and an open heart.  That involves  learning to fully engage, to give ourselves to life, but without being naive or neglecting ourselves. (We’re part of life too.)  There are   Buddhist meditation practices that are specifically designed to help us do this, and we’ll be exploring some of them over these 6 days. We’ll focus especially on the principles behind them,  because once we’re grounded in those principles we’ll be much freer, more alive and  flowing in how we practise. 

Although the theme of this retreat follows on from the Bodhicitta Practice retreat last month, you don’t need to have been on that one to join and benefit from this one.  Again the retreat will be on a dana basis. And we’ll do our best to do the impossible, and find session timings that work for people from around the world.  Here you will find full details of the theme, and how to book.

All good wishes,

Vessantara 

 

 

 

 

Sangharakshita on Just Sitting

During the recent retreat that I led at Adhisthana on Spiritual Receptivity, I discussed how little Sangharakshita has said about Just Sitting (formless meditation) over the years. In the recent compilation of his discussions of meditation, which runs to over 700 pages, there is only a tiny handful of references to it. By and large, he has preferred to leave it as a non-practice, a non-conceptual ice wall without any handholds or footholds for the intellect.

However, he has spelt out in very clear terms what true Just Sitting is about. In a discussion during the seminar on Rechungpa’s Repentance from the Hundred Thousand Songs of Milarepa, he gives a clear description of the state of ‘existential relaxation’ that is involved.

I shared the passage with the retreatants and several people said they found it helpful, so I’ve put it up here.